Dating spencer microscopes

Content
  • vintage microscope
  • Antique & Vintage Microscopes
  • US4605287A – Surgical microscope for two surgeons – Google Patents
  • Investigating the Origins of a Spencer Monocular Microscope
  • Lot of 7 AO Spencer microscopes and 1 Reichert microscope
  • Microscope

The historical microscope collection housed in the Moody Medical Library is considered one of the major collections of its type owned by an academic institution in the United States. The collection consists of representative samples documenting the development of microscopy from the 18th through the first quarter of the 20th century. The work of more than 30 individual makers or firms is included. The microscope collection dates from , when the Library acquired 33 microscopes from Dr.

vintage microscope

I’m a microscope enthusiast and amateur microscopist, if you will, and the microscopes that I own OK, that I could afford: Because these instruments all date from the ‘s and ‘s or before, information on them is becoming harder and harder to find. Again, though, for AO Microscopes, what cleaning agent to use shouldn’t be a mystery because recommendations are given by AO in the manuals for your specific scope as found below.[rs_table_products tableName=”Best Dating Websites”]

Many of these files were furnished to me by Robert Tolley, after I had contributed a Darkfield manual and the newer Series 10 manual, who in-turn, received it from others, so I believe that many amateurs have probably contributed to this collection over the years. I have since tried to add to it as documents or scans have been kindly sent to me, or I have been able to bid on them on eBay. I am searching for an AO Series 2 or Series 4 reference manual, if you have one, please contact me.

The version is available at Gordon’s site in two parts: The version is available right here 2. The version is also available right here 2. The Dual Viewing Adapter Manual is available here. The AO Series 10 Catalog 3. Patrick Moore has kindly hosted this file on his site. The AO Cycloptic Manuals: Cycloptic Dual Viewing Addendum 0. Ma ke sure you read R. Jordan Kreindler’s Micscape article on the Cycloptic.

The version 4. The version 3. The version in two parts: A must read! This book was revised and republished over the years as AO Spencer’s microscope line evolved. There are: Why am I trying to get a copy of multiple versions? Unreasoned obsession? I believe that during the years above, these are the only ‘users manuals’ AO Spencer provided for their microscopes. The AO Blue Book It’s pages! This is an as yet incomplete, but slowly growing, earlier ca version of The Red Book in 14c below.

The AO Red Book — Contributed by Dave Jackson. A famous successor to the Blue Book above in 14a. The microscope pages from the Macalaster Bicknell Company catalog — a laboratory supply dealer. I Saw Them Making Microscopes 1. This is a page ‘walk through’ of the AO Spencer plant in The Microscope – Construction, Use, and Care 6. This scanned booklet courtesy of Eldred Spell. Pdf is here. Spencer Microscope Accessories 1.

Spencer Lamps 0. Spencer ‘How to Use and Care for the Microscope’ 1. Features the Series 45 and This scanned booklet courtesy of Matt Brin. Spencer ‘The Use of Polarizing Microscopes 3. This document is housed on Eldred Spell’s site. Stereoscopic Microscope Reference Manual — Series 20, 21, 23, 25, 26, 27, and A American Optical publication, written by Oscar W. This document courtesy of Matt Brin. Spencer Research Microscopes, catalog M , dated May, and accompanying price list.

These documents courtesy of Tom Woods. Also, see Bill Resch’s article on Micscape for an example of refurbing a Also, they seem to be very helpful and friendly too — so they may be able to answer your questions if you drop them an email or a phone call about one of the newer models. I also have scanned images of the following listed in no particular order. William Porter who translated it from German. Looking for the Joseph Leidy Microscopy portal? Click Here.

What Are You Looking for? Including finding out the date of manufacture of your scope from the serial number. Right Here. Repair Tips for AO Microscopes? Try Here. Check Gordon’s site Here. If you happen to have a Zeiss-Jena Microscope then go here. Another small, but growing, cache of manuals is here. Leitz Pol microscope info — don’t miss here. A new resource has appeared for Leitz owners! Don’t miss here. Here is a resource for Olympus microscope owners. Information on Polarizing, Petrographic, and Geological Microscopes of all brands.

See Greg McHone’s wonderful site here for manuals, catalogs, and guidance on many models and manufacturers. Advice on Buying a Microscope? Try Gordon’s page Here. Advice on Microscopy and Using Your Microscope? You should read Micscape every month for fascinating articles on the world of amateur microscopy. The encyclopedia of all microscope knowledge on the web is Molecular Expressions — spend some time there if you can. Many knowledgeable microscope enthusiasts frequent Yahoo’s ‘Microscope’ forum.

If you need to locate a manual for particular microscope, or just need help with pretty much any microscope related issue, join the forum it’s free! Also visit and query the Amateur Microscopy net which also is frequented by knowledgeable enthusiasts and, as a bonus, contains arguably the best photomicrography found anywhere in the world professional or amateur! Zeiss’s ‘Microscopy from the very beginning’ is another excellent introduction to modern microscopy note: Looking for advice on cleaning your microscope’s optics?

First, see the excellent page here. Remember though that the cement used in microscope optics changed greatly over the years and you should definitely consult the manufacturer’s directions in the manual for your specific microscope. A good Yahoo Microscope Group thread on this topic can also be found here. The Zeiss document, ‘The Clean Microscope’, referred to in the thread, can be found here download the brochure.

Viewing an excellent online video: Imaging the Hidden World: View it! You’ll enjoy it I promise. For microscopy as a hobby in general, you can’t do much better than Werner Nachtigall’s ‘Exploring with the Microscope’. This book is out of print but there are almost always used, as new, copies for sale either on eBay or from bookfinder. It really is a ‘must have’. For learning about the microscope and how to use it, and what to buy, etc.

Get it! No hobbyist and maybe a professional or two too ;- should be without this book. For the history of the microscope, and lots of insights into why things evolved as they have, Hartley’s ‘The Light Microscope: It’s Use and Development’ is the ultimate resource. Unfortunately, it is usually very expensive, but watch on bookfinder.

Don’t miss Robert Bagnells ‘Light Microsopy’. Look for it on bookfinder. The edition 7.

AO (American Optical) Spencer Microscope Manuals and Catalogs (Including finding out the date of manufacture of your scope from the serial number). Spencer Number 1 microscope Spencer No 1 with Engraving from Gage It has inscribed on it the patent dates of March 14, and December 11,

This ‘Continental Style’ microscope sits on a Y-shaped ‘horseshoe’ foot. Arising from the foot is a short pillar, to which the main body of the microscope is attached via a compass joint. Atop the microscope is a standard 22 mm diameter ocular which fits into the chrome-plated graduated draw-tube. Coarse focus is by diagonal rack and pinion a Swift innovation. There is a patented adjustment for pressure of the outer fitting against the bearings of the coarse adjustment, which is adjusted by a silver-colored knob.

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Spencer brass microscope with stage. Meticulously preserved example of a continental pattern microscope by Spencer. Signed “Spencer Lens Co.

US4605287A – Surgical microscope for two surgeons – Google Patents

For full functionality of this site it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser. Loading bid history American Optical Model: Transformer – model:

Investigating the Origins of a Spencer Monocular Microscope

The historical microscope collection housed in the Moody Medical Library is considered one of the major collections of its type owned by an academic institution in the United States. The collection consists of representative samples documenting the development of microscopy from the 18th through the first quarter of the 20th century. The work of more than 30 individual makers or firms is included. The microscope collection dates from , when the Library acquired 33 microscopes from Dr. John Bunyan with a grant from the Moody Foundation of Galveston. Bunyan provided additional instruments as well as partial cataloging for the collection in subsequent years. Of the 82 instruments, 60 percent are associated with him. The remaining consists of microscopes from the Departments of Anatomy and Pathology, gifts from former faculty and friends of the University, and a purchase of replica microscopes. From the Microscope Gallery, you can access the images and descriptions of the instruments in the Moody Medical Library’s historical collection. You will also find brief information about thirty microscope makers and firms,whose works are represented in the collection.

The invention relates to two optically-mechanically coupled surgical or operating microscopes wherein the viewing beam paths pass through a common optical element. Certain microsurgical interventions, for example, in hand surgery, cannot be executed by a single surgeon; they require the cooperation of at least one assistant.

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Lot of 7 AO Spencer microscopes and 1 Reichert microscope

A microscope from the Ancient Greek: Microscopy is the science of investigating small objects and structures using such an instrument. Microscopic means invisible to the eye unless aided by a microscope. There are many types of microscopes, and they may be grouped in different ways. One way is to describe the way the instruments interact with a sample to create images, either by sending a beam of light or electrons to a sample in its optical path, or by scanning across, and a short distance from the surface of a sample using a probe. The most common microscope and the first to be invented is the optical microscope , which uses light to pass through a sample to produce an image. Other major types of microscopes are the fluorescence microscope , the electron microscope both the transmission electron microscope and the scanning electron microscope and the various types of scanning probe microscopes. Although objects resembling lenses date back years and there are Greek accounts of the optical properties of water-filled spheres 5th century BC followed by many centuries of writings on optics, the earliest known use of simple microscopes magnifying glasses dates back to the widespread use of lenses in eyeglasses in the 13th century. The first detailed account of the microscopic anatomy of organic tissue based on the use of a microscope did not appear until , in Giambattista Odierna’s L’occhio della mosca , or The Fly’s Eye. The microscope was still largely a novelty until the s and s when naturalists in Italy, the Netherlands and England began using them to study biology.

Microscope

For full functionality of this site it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser. Loading bid history The others appear to be complete. All have objectives and oculars– one microscope is missing one ocular though. There are enough lamp housings for 6 of the 7 microscopes. No bulbs are included.

Nothing ages as elegantly as an antique microscope. A bridge to an age when craftsmanship was as important as functionality, a vintage microscope is a work of art as well as science. In the late 16th century several Dutch lens makers designed devices that magnified objects, but in Galileo Galilei perfected the first device known as a microscope. His invention, a compound microscope, had a convex and a concave lens. Later that century, Anton van Leeuwenhoek refined the microscope for biological research. These first fledgling microscopes were generally built and used by a scientist.

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I’m a microscope enthusiast and amateur microscopist, if you will, and the microscopes that I own OK, that I could afford: Because these instruments all date from the ‘s and ‘s or before, information on them is becoming harder and harder to find. Again, though, for AO Microscopes, what cleaning agent to use shouldn’t be a mystery because recommendations are given by AO in the manuals for your specific scope as found below. Many of these files were furnished to me by Robert Tolley, after I had contributed a Darkfield manual and the newer Series 10 manual, who in-turn, received it from others, so I believe that many amateurs have probably contributed to this collection over the years. I have since tried to add to it as documents or scans have been kindly sent to me, or I have been able to bid on them on eBay. I am searching for an AO Series 2 or Series 4 reference manual, if you have one, please contact me. The version is available at Gordon’s site in two parts:

Do you have something to share that would enrich our knowledge about this object? Please use the form below. Selected comments will appear on this page. Have a question about anything else, or would you prefer a personal response? Please visit our FAQ or contact page.

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